2013 Grad - Muhammed

Graduated from Envision in London 2013.   -  By Richie Benson

For us to come together and experience what you can achieve with a few hours work, it really made us think about what we could achieve later in life if we applied ourselves.


Envision project

WTF? (which stood for Where's the Freedom?) which aimed to raise awareness of human rights issues.  His team developed workshops in our school and persuaded representatives of large charities and NGOs to come to their school and give talks. They set up a FB page that at one time had 12000 followers.

Envision memory

The feeling of empowerment and seeing how much you can achieve when you put your mind to it. We started off as a group of 16 year olds who were quite left wing, not really knowing where to go or what to do.  None of us had any connections before but, we just created a network from scratch and got to a stage where we could persuade people to come into our school and give talks and speeches.  

I’ve never had any exposure to stuff like that; my parents would never do anything like it, and our group had no exposure to fundraising or political activism.  For us to come together and experience what you can achieve with a few hours work, it really made us think about what we could achieve later in life if we applied ourselves.

Doing now

On the KPMG Audit school leaver programme, getting real life audit experience for a  'Big 4' accounting firm while studying for a degree at university and a professional qualification at the same time.

Muhammed is also an Envision mentor, working with some of the current cohort to help develop their strategies for social action and has returned to his school to present for about career opportunities with KPMG.

What did you get out of Envision?

An understanding of the importance of ambition and persistence. I think the biggest thing young people in inner cities suffer from is lack of ambition to make any kind of progress or change and to see anything apart from what is right in front of you. I do Envision mentoring now with Birmingham University School and I don't like to use the word role-model because it implies that person is perfect and I was far from perfect. I've made plenty of mistakes in my life and experienced failures along the way, but I'm not afraid of that anymore, so I don't like to say I'm a role model. I'm more like a real-model!  It's about communicating to the young people the idea that I have a vision about who I want to be and regardless of how many times I get knocked down I'm going to get back up again.